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Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 28th 05, 10:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans GDB3), does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long enough?

--
Max Demian


  #2  
Old December 29th 05, 01:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans GDB3), does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long enough?


Typically the new version overwrites the old version, so the old version is lost
anyway.

--

Michael Chare




  #3  
Old December 29th 05, 04:21 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

In message , Michael Chare
wrote
"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans GDB3), does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long enough?


Typically the new version overwrites the old version, so the old
version is lost
anyway.


Not necessarily, the Setpal boxes kept 2 copies of upgrades plus the
original factory installed version. On a reset (holding down the reset
button whilst applying mains power) or on selecting an older update the
newer update(s) will be lost forever. I do mean forever as there are
unlikely to be any more over the air updates for these boxes.


--
Alan
news2005 {at} amac {dot} f2s {dot} com
  #4  
Old December 29th 05, 09:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

"Alan" wrote in message
...
In message , Michael Chare
wrote
"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans

GDB3), does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it

revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long

enough?

Typically the new version overwrites the old version, so the old
version is lost
anyway.


Not necessarily, the Setpal boxes kept 2 copies of upgrades plus the
original factory installed version. On a reset (holding down the

reset
button whilst applying mains power) or on selecting an older update

the
newer update(s) will be lost forever. I do mean forever as there are
unlikely to be any more over the air updates for these boxes.


--
Alan
news2005 {at} amac {dot} f2s {dot} com


Setpal may not give any more software updates but that doesn't seem to
stop them still putting those awful ad promos on the bottom of the EPG.
Regards Mike.

  #5  
Old December 29th 05, 11:37 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

"Michael Chare" wrote in message
...
"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans GDB3),
does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it
revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long enough?


Typically the new version overwrites the old version, so the old version
is lost
anyway.


That's not what I asked. I wanted to know whether the box would lose the
latest version if left unplugged.

--
Max Demian


  #6  
Old December 29th 05, 12:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Posts: n/a
Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
"Michael Chare" wrote in message
...
"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans GDB3),
does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it
revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long enough?


Typically the new version overwrites the old version, so the old version
is lost
anyway.


That's not what I asked. I wanted to know whether the box would lose the
latest version if left unplugged.


My point was that if the original just gets overwritten, there would be nothing
to go back to if the software could get lost through absence of power. You would
not expect the box to be made like that, it might lie stock for some time before
being sold.

Clearly not all boxes are made the same way, but I doubt that any would loose
software just because they are powered of for some time.

(I've got other devices e.g. GPS, Mobile phone, modems which don't loose updated
firmware even if kept powered off.)


--

Michael Chare



  #7  
Old December 29th 05, 01:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

In article , Alan wrote:
Typically the new version overwrites the old version, so the old
version is lost
anyway.


Not necessarily, the Setpal boxes kept 2 copies of upgrades plus the
original factory installed version. On a reset (holding down the reset
button whilst applying mains power) or on selecting an older update the
newer update(s) will be lost forever.


Correct. I discovered this after my first update, and thereafter would
always apply a manual update as well, so that the "backup" copy wouild be
the same as the operational one and I would have no risk of accidentally
reverting to a previous version.

I do mean forever as there are
unlikely to be any more over the air updates for these boxes.


A shame, because they're good receivers, or at least the one I have is
still working well. There must be lots on shelves that haven't had any
recent updates but would otherwise be bargains. The 9-programme timer for
instance only appeared with a software update, so earlier versions won't
have this.

Rod.

  #8  
Old December 29th 05, 01:26 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

In article , Michael Chare wrote:
That's not what I asked. I wanted to know whether the box would lose the
latest version if left unplugged.


My point was that if the original just gets overwritten, there would be nothing
to go back to if the software could get lost through absence of power.


The action of "going back", i.e. swapping software versions, would require the
device to be powered wouldn't it, for the action to be performed, so this wouldn't
happen spontaneously simply as a result of leaving it in a cupboard.

Thinking about it, if it is the operating firmware itself that is overwritten by a
software update, then the device would cease to be able to function as anything
without it. Electronic devices would effectively be "perishable goods" that would
forget what they were and how to work if left unplugged, and most of them wouldn't
survive the boat trip from the far east. New electronic gadgets straight out of
the boxes they have been packed in for a few weeks, or months, generally know what
they are and work first time, so I assume they don't have "perishable brains" such
as you suggest.

Rod.

  #9  
Old December 29th 05, 02:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

Max Demian wrote:

When you upgrade the software on a Freeview box (e.g. Goodmans GDB3), does
it go into (completely) non-volatile (e.g flash) memory, or will it revert
to the original version if you leave the box unplugged for long enough?


The firmware update will typically be written to the flash memory of the
box - so once programmed it will stay that way until explicitly
overwritten or erased. (i.e. it is not held in battery backed static
RAM, if that is what you were getting at).

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #10  
Old December 29th 05, 03:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Default Freeview boxes non-volatile memory?

will freeview boxes software revert?

Shouldn't do. Most will have "flash" eeproms. "Battery backup" is an
older generation technology!

 




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