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broadcasting after brexit



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 8th 19, 10:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 3,153
Default broadcasting after brexit

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/asse...-leaves-EU.pdf

Bill
  #2  
Old January 8th 19, 11:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
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Posts: 4,099
Default broadcasting after brexit

On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 21:43:52 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/asse...-leaves-EU.pdf

Bill


Thanks. Interesting.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #3  
Old January 9th 19, 09:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,451
Default broadcasting after brexit

On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 22:38:45 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 21:43:52 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/asse...-leaves-EU.pdf

Bill


Thanks. Interesting.


This bit is worth pointing out-

"If a broadcaster has its head office in one country but editorial
decisions on programme schedules are taken in another country, it will
be considered to be established in the country where a significant
part of the workforce operates".

It makes me wonder why the same general principle couldn't just as
easily be applied to the rate of tax paid by a company that has its
head office in one country but a workforce that operates in another.
It seems to be a problem with some large companies for some reason,
but the above example certainly looks like a precedent to me.

Rod.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

  #4  
Old January 9th 19, 11:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_4_]
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Posts: 1,987
Default broadcasting after brexit

On Wed 09/01/2019 08:52, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 22:38:45 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 21:43:52 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/asse...-leaves-EU.pdf

Bill


Thanks. Interesting.


This bit is worth pointing out-

"If a broadcaster has its head office in one country but editorial
decisions on programme schedules are taken in another country, it will
be considered to be established in the country where a significant
part of the workforce operates".

It makes me wonder why the same general principle couldn't just as
easily be applied to the rate of tax paid by a company that has its
head office in one country but a workforce that operates in another.
It seems to be a problem with some large companies for some reason,
but the above example certainly looks like a precedent to me.


The cross-border bit might explain why Belgium and The Netherlands
(amongst others) that are not of the ECTT group transmit UK programmes
on cable.

It begs the question of what happens to the UK transmitters in Ulster
that broadcast an RTE mux as well?

Per the comment above, where does Sky stand in this - given that most of
their management is in the UK notably for Sky Eire?


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
  #5  
Old January 9th 19, 01:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_10_]
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Posts: 86
Default broadcasting after brexit

On 09/01/2019 08:52, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 22:38:45 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 21:43:52 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/asse...-leaves-EU.pdf

Bill


Thanks. Interesting.


This bit is worth pointing out-

"If a broadcaster has its head office in one country but editorial
decisions on programme schedules are taken in another country, it will
be considered to be established in the country where a significant
part of the workforce operates".

It makes me wonder why the same general principle couldn't just as
easily be applied to the rate of tax paid by a company that has its
head office in one country but a workforce that operates in another.
It seems to be a problem with some large companies for some reason,
but the above example certainly looks like a precedent to me.


That'd be nothing new. The tax system has long given country A the
right to tax the profits of operations in country A from what's known as
a "permanent establishment" in A - and the presence of a workforce doing
stuff in A would be a permanent establishment. The problem is, very
broadly speaking, defining the net taxable profit in A when there may be
all sorts of legitimate payments to other countries - for components,
interest, royalties, etc etc .


--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #6  
Old January 12th 19, 02:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Youlden[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default broadcasting after brexit

On 09/01/2019 10:50, Woody wrote:

It begs the question of what happens to the UK transmitters in Ulster
that broadcast an RTE mux as well?


That's part of the Good Friday agreement which is exempt from these
arrangements.

--

Chris
  #7  
Old January 12th 19, 06:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,099
Default broadcasting after brexit

On Wed, 9 Jan 2019 10:50:39 +0000, Woody
wrote:

On Wed 09/01/2019 08:52, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 22:38:45 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 21:43:52 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/asse...-leaves-EU.pdf

Bill

Thanks. Interesting.


This bit is worth pointing out-

"If a broadcaster has its head office in one country but editorial
decisions on programme schedules are taken in another country, it will
be considered to be established in the country where a significant
part of the workforce operates".

It makes me wonder why the same general principle couldn't just as
easily be applied to the rate of tax paid by a company that has its
head office in one country but a workforce that operates in another.
It seems to be a problem with some large companies for some reason,
but the above example certainly looks like a precedent to me.


The cross-border bit might explain why Belgium and The Netherlands
(amongst others) that are not of the ECTT group transmit UK programmes
on cable.


As far as I know the two matters below have nothing to do with the EU.

It begs the question of what happens to the UK transmitters in Ulster
that broadcast an RTE mux as well?

Per the comment above, where does Sky stand in this - given that most of
their management is in the UK notably for Sky Eire?


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
 




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