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Call The Madwife Reggae Radio



 
 
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  #31  
Old February 14th 19, 03:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,617
Default Call The Madwife Reggae Radio

"Terry Casey" wrote in message
...
The most obvious ones are programmes set in the 30s, say, with
locomotives in BR livery or set in the 50s and 60s with locos
in LMS, LNER, GWR, etc livery.


I suppose the latter *might* be plausible if BR inherited old Big Four stock
and hadn't got round to repainting its livery with BR black lion-and-wheel.
But BR before 1947 is definitely an anachronism.

My grandpa was a keen steam enthusiast and took great delight (much to the
annoyance of the rest of the family) in pointing out inconsistencies in
livery, loco numbers and stations-versus-viaducts ("that train's set off
from King's Cross though it's got Southern Livery - and now it's gone over
Maidenhead Bridge: impossible!").

I read somewhere of a director who decided deliberately to cram in as many
railway-related anachronisms and inconsistencies as possible into one of his
films, in the hope that this would give the railway enthusiasts something to
notice and to complain about, so they wouldn't spot any unintentional
mistakes that may have crept in accidentally.

  #32  
Old February 14th 19, 04:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Alex[_4_]
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Posts: 2
Default Call The Madwife Reggae Radio


"NY" wrote in message
...

That's funny. I too thought I'd read that the AM bandwidth had been
reduced at some stage in the last few decades. Maybe it's the
baseband signal that has reduced bandwidth, even though still in the
same LW/MW 9 kHz channel spacing. I presume the absolute maximum
audio bandwidth is 4.5 kHz since AM is double side band plus
carrier; maybe the audio signal is now low-pass filtered at
significantly less than 4.5 kHz.


There is scant information on the web relating to this, but it looks
as if the agreements pre-1978 were not strictly enforced by any
country, so perhaps stations used to just broadcast at a higher
bandwidth regardless of the small potential for interference with
other stations hundreds of miles away on adjacent frequencies.

I do remember Atlantic 252 in the early 90s sounding quite good. AIUI
they broadcast within their allocated bandwidth, but the carrier was
offset slightly, allowing one of the sidebands to be higher bandwidth.
A very cheap LW radio I owned at the time (with rotary tuning) mustn't
have had the narrowband filtering that most receivers do nowadays so
the difference was audible.


  #33  
Old February 15th 19, 02:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
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Default Call The Madwife Reggae Radio

In article , Chris J Dixon
scribeth thus
NY wrote:

Ah, I was never sure about the exact legal position. I remember a group of
us at university listening to the police (the actual fuzz, not Sting's band,
on this occasion!) and we stumbled on what sounded like a car chase. They
mentioned a few road names and we thought "that's getting a bit bloody
close". A few minutes later there were bright blue lights and we looked out
to see a police car bombing down the narrow unmade lane that separated our
hall of residence from another one.


With my Yacht Boy I occasionally listened in to Manchester
police, but mostly you only got one side of a conversation.


Thats because its a talk through repeater system using two frequencies
you were listening to the base transmit which usually kept an engaged
tone on the go signifying to other mobile users that the base was in a
conversation with another mobile which was not re transmitted on the
base frequency it was being heard back at control.

If there was a need for car to cars comms then they'd switch it to
talkthrough mode so the mobile on the input frequency was re broadcast
on the base transmit one..


When they had to cope with the mass protests against the
Springbok ruby team in 1969, Peter Hain being a key motivator. I
presume that they were using some form of talk-through. I clearly
remember that things must have been getting "interesting" when
they reported "On Deansgate, all hell's let loose".

Chris


--
Tony Sayer



  #34  
Old February 15th 19, 08:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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Posts: 2,340
Default Call The Madwife Reggae Radio

On Fri, 15 Feb 2019 13:24:43 +0000
tony sayer wrote:

Thats because its a talk through repeater system using two frequencies
you were listening to the base transmit which usually kept an engaged
tone on the go signifying to other mobile users that the base was in a
conversation with another mobile which was not re transmitted on the
base frequency it was being heard back at control.

If there was a need for car to cars comms then they'd switch it to
talkthrough mode so the mobile on the input frequency was re broadcast
on the base transmit one..


That's how my US employer's Motorola system worked. We all had our own
radio handsets, and they worked like that whenever we went to jobsites,
which had repeaters set to a certain licensed base frequency, which
transmitted at a higher power than the handsets. If there was no
repeater, then the handsets could be switched to the same frequency
for transmit and receive, and would communicate with each other, but at
the lower power.

--
Davey.
  #35  
Old February 15th 19, 08:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Holmes
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Posts: 65
Default Call The Madwife Reggae Radio

To bring thinks back on topic 11::^*))

I suppose he could have brought a portable record player and a stack of singles with him.

  #36  
Old February 15th 19, 10:05 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Marland
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Posts: 43
Default Call The Madwife Reggae Radio

Terry Casey wrote:
In article a6f4d009-f108-48d8-b881-7bbc286bda44
@googlegroups.com, says...


It was about 24 hours later that it occurred to me that in
1964 you?d be lucky to get The Beatles on the BBC during the working
week, let alone reggae.

Leaving aside that he might have had a reel to reel running of an
extension lead, is there anyway this could have happened back then.

We?re there localised, specialist Pirate Stations broadcasting during
the day in London back then (I presume it?s too early for cassette??)?


The only pirate station in 1964 was Radio Caroline (Radio
Caroline South was briefly Radio Atlanta until the two
amalgamated). They were then joined, very late in the year, by
Radio London.

All Medium Wave, of course. Apart from anything else, the
majority of listeners didn't own FM receivers, mainly due to
HMG's insistence that the BBC had three programmes and that
was all we were going to have in perpetuity!

The only way to promote FM was as 'interference free' but AM
interference levels were very low back then so the public, in
the main, saw no reason to spend money on very expensive AM/FM
models which offered them nothing but what they'd already got!

ISTR that most of the sets referred to VHF rather than FM,mother could not
stand the interference and fading
of MW transmissions and was and purchased a set in 1964, the transmitter
was North Hessary Tor which had been transmitting FM radio for 8 years by
then.

GH

 




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